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Le usanze di San Martino

November 11 is the anniversary of San Martino, patron saint of the city of Belluno and several other municipalities in the province such as Valle and Vigo di Cadore, co-patron of the Diocese of Belluno-Feltre together with Saints Vittore and Corona.

Throughout northern Italy, this was the day when contracts and agricultural rents expired and then "making San Martino" became synonymous with "moving", in memory of the relocation that peasant families had to make in this season in search of a new living and working place.

In the upper part of the province of Belluno sharecropping and similar types of peasant contracts did not exist, but the festival of San Martino was however deeply felt, since it marked the end of the work in the fields and the beginning of the winter season.

Still today, in some places, there is the tradition of children visiting the houses of the village singing songs and rhymes in praise of the saint in exchange for sweets (once mainly dried fruit) in honour of the generosity of San Martino.

Socio Fondatore

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Le usanze di San Martino

November 11 is the anniversary of San Martino, patron saint of the city of Belluno and several other municipalities in the province such as Valle and Vigo di Cadore, co-patron of the Diocese of Belluno-Feltre together with Saints Vittore and Corona.

Throughout northern Italy, this was the day when contracts and agricultural rents expired and then "making San Martino" became synonymous with "moving", in memory of the relocation that peasant families had to make in this season in search of a new living and working place.

In the upper part of the province of Belluno sharecropping and similar types of peasant contracts did not exist, but the festival of San Martino was however deeply felt, since it marked the end of the work in the fields and the beginning of the winter season.

Still today, in some places, there is the tradition of children visiting the houses of the village singing songs and rhymes in praise of the saint in exchange for sweets (once mainly dried fruit) in honour of the generosity of San Martino.